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YEE GEE KIM YEUNG MA

Stance Key Points:

1. Toes inside 90 degrees ( 45 degrees is optimal )

2. Knees slightly bent about 10 degrees 

3. Slightly stretch the spine

4. Crown of the head is slightly stretched

5. Tucked chin

6. Slight posterior pelvic tilt of the hips


SIU LIM TAO

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SIU LIM TAO SECTION 1

The first clip in this video shows the beginning of the Siu Lim Tau in sequence showing how to flow from one technique to next. The second clip in this video explains the details. Viewing both clips will expedite the learning process. 

Two blocks that may not have been articulated in the video are Sup Ge Sau and Kwan Sau both of which are demonstrated before the punches.

The most important part of SLT is to develop your stance.

 

 

Stance Key Points:

1. Toes inside 90 degrees  (45 degrees is optimal )

2. Knees slightly bent about 10 degrees

3. Slightly stretch the spine

4. Crown of the head is slightly stretched

5. Tucked chin

6. Slight posterior pelvic tilt of the hips


SIU LIM TAO SECTION 2

This is the 2nd of the 3 sections of the SLT form. This and the remaining 3rd section of SLT are to be performed at a regular pace with regular 1 beat timing.

It is good to practice the techniques in this section slow and precise by placing your techniques in the proper positions to develop neuro-pathways.

Gradual development of natural relaxed power is achieved by stopping and releasing your power after each motion. No additional power is necessary for development.

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SIU LIM TAO SECTION 3

This is the 3rd and final section of the SLT form. Again this section is to be performed at regular speed with self timing.

It is good to practice the techniques in this section slow and precise by placing your techniques in the proper positions to develop neuro-pathways.

Gradual development of natural relaxed power is achieved by stopping and releasing your power after each motion. No additional power is necessary for development.

Reminder: Be sure to keep your 5 brothers together. ( fingers and thumbs )

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The Wing Chun Vertical Punch

How to create a fist and perform the devastating Wing Chun straight punch

Key Points:

1. Middle knuckle on the center line

2. Push and pull with your elbows using the principle of opposite directional forces or yin and yang 

3. Be careful NOT to hyperextend your elbows 

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Tan Da Gaan Da: 

Tan Da Gaan Da teaches you to block simultaneously while striking in addition to upper and lower gate defense.

This is taught in the beginning as a stationary drill.

 No additional power is necessary and technique placement is key. 

Power comes through repetition.

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The First 5 Elbows

The basic attacking positions for the first 5 elbows.

Key Points:

1. The second elbow goes slightly behind and then over in a circle. 

2. Make sure you turn on your heels.

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The 5 Basic Blocks

The 5 Basic Blocks can be practiced with a partner or with your "Muk Yan Jong"( Wooden Dummy).

Used for conditioning, learning to share the line and developing your blocks.

5 Blocks used in order are as follows:

  1. Inside Gaan Sau

  2. Tan Sau

  3. Regular Gaan Sau

  4. Jaam Sau

  5. Wu Sau


10  SINGLE MAN BLOCKS

By practicing these basic blocks over and over again you will naturally incorporate them into your Gor Sau (blocking and attacking out of Chi Sau). 


Bue Sau

Bue Sau is one of the more commonly used blocks in the Wing Chun system.

Key Points:

1. To be performed at eye level

2. Middle finger on the center line

3. Back hand comes out in a straight line with no arch.

 


Fak Sau

A long bridge block

Key Points:

1. To be performed at eye level

2. Wu Sau on the quarter line

 


Bong Sau

One of the more commonly used blocks in the Wing Chun system.

Key Points:

1. Elbow higher than shoulder, shoulder higher than hand 

2. Approximately 135 degree bend in the Bong Sau elbow

3. Wu Sau on the quarter line

4. Applied hand over hand

 


Hoi Kwan Sau

Commonly known as rolling hands and is a vital block in the Wing Chun System. This block rolls from the inside, out.

Key Points:

1. Utilizes the same center line points as the Bong Sau but in low position

2. Wrist over wrist

3. Tan Sau has the middle finger pointed to the center line


Tan Pak Sau

Tan Pak will not be applied directly middle finger over middle finger as in the single man development. 

Key Points:

1. Stay relaxed and don't let your elbows flare

2. Middle finger to middle finger almost touching each other

 


Gaan Jaam Sau

This is a great transitional block and the idea in the future will be to hit rather than block. 

Key Points: 

1. DO NOT go side to side but rather keep the intent of the block going in a forward motion

2. Exaggerate the block in the beginning and then slowly refine the block and shorten up the motion


Ngoi Kwan Sau

The other rolling hands block which will be going from the outside in.

Key Points:

1. Accentuate the transition from the Ngoi to the Jaam Sau

2. Elbow higher than shoulder and shoulder higher than hand

3. Can be used as a block and attack simultaneously


Gum Sau

Gum Sau is used to block attacks below the horizontal and waist line. 

Key Points:

1.  Practice both full extended Gum Sau as well as  half Gum Sau.

2. For full Gum Sau your elbow cannot be bent.


Ding Haan Sau

Blocking the upper and lower gates.

Key Points: 

1. Straight arms: no bent elbows

2. The blocks share the line during transition

3. Try to keep your fingers facing upward as possible in the Haan Position

4. Fingers and thumbs together. This goes for all blocks but is more difficult in Ding Haan



Wu Jet Sau

Key Points:

1. Make sure your Wu Sau comes under your Jet Sau during transition. 

2. Your Wu Sau will be slightly "augmented" and will not be completely vertical

3. The Jet Sau will have a "V" shape on the ulnar side

CHOR MA FOOTWORK

The turning stance

Key Points:

1. When you bend your knees to get into your stance it rotates your pelvis under which in turn firms up your core. When you practice your chor ma for a while you may start to feel that it is the core that initiates your turning.

2. The combination of the pelvis rotating under and the firming up of your core connects you knees to your pelvis, your pelvis to your shoulders so that your body moves together.

3. Your weight should be distributed evenly throughout your foot however you will be turning on your heels.

4. Your weight should be distributed 50/50.

5. Avoid bobbing up and down while practicing chor ma.

 

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SUNG MA FOOTWORK

This footwork is for fighting.

Key Points: 

1. Your stance should be close to shoulder width

2. Open front foot 45 degrees and advance your back foot forward with a crescent motion. 

3. Weight distribution is 50/50

4. Heel on the line and toe on the line

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TOR MA FOOTWORK

The chasing footwork also known as "Step Slide"

Key Points:

1. Heel to toe, shoulders straight, stretch the spine, pull the crown of your head up and tuck your chin in slightly

2. Push off with your back foot and lift up your front leg

3. Maintain the proper distance with your stance each time you step slide

SIP MA FOOT

Key Points:

1. Step out 45 degrees with your front leg

2. Crescent through and adjust with back leg

3. Land with your base in a proper width

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TOI MA FOOTWORK

Moving backward footwork. This is a deflecting type of stance/footwork.

Key Points:

1. Weight on the back foot first

2. Step back and pivot with the font leg

3. Make sure to land heel to toe with a good base

MIXING FOOTWORK

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

1. CHOR MA - Basic Turning 

2. SUNG MA - Forward Advancing

3. TOI MA - Backward Deflecting 

4. TOR MA - Step Slide

5. SIP MA - 3 Angle Walk

Note for all footwork: heel to toe + shoulders strait + stretch the spine + pull the crown of your head up + tuck your chin in slightly

KEEP A GOOD BASE!

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CHOR MA PAI JONG

Key Points:

  1. Fingers over your elbows
  2. Slight tilt of your arms
  3. Firm your core & drive with your knees
  4. Turn on your axis

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LAN SAU TO BONG SAU

Key Points:

  1. Create a retangular Lan Sau position
  2. Firm your core
  3. Drive with your knees and turn as a unit
  4. Turn on your axis and be mindful to not add any additional upper body power

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